State Of The Art: Missouri’s SORRY, SCOUT [Album Stream]

*This is part of our State Of The Art series, showcasing bands every Monday from the featured state. This month’s state is Missouri.*

Sorry, Scout describe themselves as an “Indie rock/pop punk/ Americana” hybrid out of St. Louis that write songs about “love, gentrification, police brutality, bigotry and survival in an increasingly oppressive reality.

The band is made up of Randi Whitaker (vocals), Nate Jones (guitar), David Anson (bass) and Zack Schultz (drums).  They are fresh, melodic, powerful and driven. They hammer home their ideas about society with the charm of a well versed poet, armed with a supreme sense of purpose.  Their one release to dste is the anthemic artistically authentic EP ‘Never Asked For It’, which was issued in August 2018.

Sorry, Scout’s principal lyricist, Whitaker, writes about the experience of being a black trans man, and the struggles with being an individual living in St Louis.  The singing is emotional, soulful and passionate.  Whitaker is truly a talent who brings an intelligent and articulate energy to the rock medium.  The band is tight and full of fire.  Guitars blend into shuttered realms of unconsious knowing and the doors of perception are truly opened on the personal hells that have haunted lives across the world.

The EP contains three songs of hope, mixed with a baleful anger that makes for compulsive listening.

The lead off track, “Never Asked For It” puts down the marker as the choppy chords give rise to an urgency.  Whitaker’s vocal soars into the mix and then it is all an MVP performance. The voice is powerful, soulful and unique. The track is 5 minutes of perfection.

Simone” shows the acoustic side of the band, reflective but with a New Wave feel.  Again, the vocals wrap themselves around your ears and tweak at your heartstrings.  Wonderful drumming accompanies the ringing guitars.

The EP concludes with the simply superb “Great Modern Homes.” This is social conscience in essence and raises the band high with its essays on non-traditional rock issues.  It has a swagger to it that is undeniable. The song lingers long and makes the listener want to loop it on repeat.

There you have it.  Short, but oh so sweet! Check out Sorry, Scout and see why we don’t need to settle for cliches.

 

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